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Outside the Asylum: A Memoir of War, Disaster and Humanitarian Psychiatry

Lynne Jones

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Autobiography: science, technology & medicine, Prose: non-fiction, Aid & relief programmes, Armed conflict, Psychiatry

Astonishing insight into the life of a humanitarian psychiatrist working in war and disaster zones around the world - from Bosnia and 'mission-accomplished' Iraq, to tsunami-affected Aceh, post-earthquake Haiti and 'the Jungle' in Calais.

'A profound memoir' Daily Telegraph
'As revealing as the writing of Oliver Sacks' Mark Cousins

Outside the Asylum is Lynne Jones's personal and highly acclaimed exploration of humanitarian psychiatry and the changing world of international relief. Her memoir graphically describes her experiences in war zones and disasters around the world, from the Balkans and 'mission-accomplished' Iraq, to tsunami-affected Indonesia, post-earthquake Haiti and 'the Jungle' in Calais.

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Lynne Jones

Lynne Jones is a child psychiatrist, relief worker, and writer. She has spent much of the last twenty years establishing and running mental health programs in areas of conflict or natural disaster. Her field diaries have been published in the London Review of Books and O, The Oprah Magazine, and her audio diaries broadcast on the BBC World Service. She is the author of Then They Started Shooting: Growing Up in Wartime Bosnia (Harvard University Press, 2005).
Jones has an MA in human sciences from the University of Oxford. She qualified in medicine before specialising in psychiatry and has a PhD in social psychology and political science. In 2001, she was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire for her work in child psychiatry in conflict-affected areas of Central Europe. She regularly consults for UNICEF and WHO. She is currently working as a child psychiatrist in Cornwall, is an honorary consultant at the Maudsley Hospital, London, and is a visiting scientist at the Fran ois-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights, Harvard University.

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