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Imprint

  • Hodder Paperbacks
  • Hodder & Stoughton
  • Hodder & Stoughton

Thornyhold

Mary Stewart

5 Reviews

Rated 0

Fiction, Modern & contemporary fiction (post c 1945)

Reissued with a fresh cover look comes this love story delicate in its perceptions of a young woman falling in love, delightful in its portrayal of the countryside, and skilled in its creation of a world of magic. Mary Stewart's storytelling is as spell-binding as ever.

Thornyhold is a house deep in a wild wood like somewhere out of a fairy tale. To Gilly, it is an enchantment. Her very own enchantment, left to her by the cousin whose occasional magical visits had brightened her childhood. And as she explores, she discovers more about the woman who had come to seem like a fairy godmother for her: her herbalists's skills, her still room, her abilities to foresee and to heal. She discovers also that the local people believe that Gilly has inherited not just the house but the magical spell-weaving powers that live on in the house and garden. Slowly, quietly, she comes to realise that they are right.

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Praise for Thornyhold

  • In this 1940s rural scene you glimpse the shadow behind all things bright and beautiful. - Daily Mail

  • Anyone who enjoys a gentle, modern love story will find a cracker in Thornyhold - Woman's World

  • Skeins of sentences are woven into a tale of sweet magic, witchcraft and suspense . . . which will perpetuate Mrs Stewart's bestsellerdom and confirm her status as a literary phenomenon - Scotland on Sunday

  • She set the bench mark for pace, suspense and romance - with a great dollop of escapism as the icing - Elizabeth Buchan

  • A comfortable chair and a Mary Stewart: total heaven. I'd rather read her than most other authors. - Harriet Evans

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Mary Stewart

Mary Stewart was one of the 20th century's bestselling and best-loved novelists. She was born in Sunderland, County Durham in 1916, but lived for most of her life in Scotland, a source of much inspiration for her writing. Her first novel, Madam, Will You Talk? was published in 1955 and marked the beginning of a long and acclaimed writing career. In 1971 she was awarded the International PEN Association's Frederick Niven Prize for The Crystal Cave, and in 1974 the Scottish Arts Council Award for one of her children's books, Ludo and the Star Horse. She was married to the Scottish geologist Frederick Stewart, and died in 2014.

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