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  • Wayland

Mother Teresa

Paul Harrison

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For National Curriculum Key Stage 2, Interest age: from c 9 years, Biography: religious & spiritual, Prose: non-fiction, People & places (Children's / Teenage)

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A fascinating look at the life of Mother Teresa, a nun like no other.

In 1997, the death of an 87-year-old nun in Kolkata, in India, sparked an outbreak of mourning across the globe. Why? The nun was Mother Teresa - one of the most iconic spiritual figures of the 20th century. She became famous for her work with, and compassion towards, the world's poorest people. She and the fellow nuns of her order tended to the vulnerable, sick and dying in the most poverty-stricken places, providing care, love and compassion where it was most needed. But who was this extraordinary woman, and what inspired her, the daughter of a wealthy Albanian businessman, to dedicate her life to such a cause?

Mother Teresa looks at her remarkable story, and how she became such a popular and widely-celebrated figure. It looks at how and why she went about setting up her order as well as her work with people suffering from leprosy. The publicity she undertook to raise the profile of her work, and the criticism she faced, are also discussed.

The Catholic faith, and the charitable work the Church undertakes around the world, is explained, as are some of its more complex terms and processes. Boxes on each spread provide background information on topics as varied as how saints are created, the Nobel Peace Prize, Kolkata, and how an order of nuns is created.

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Paul Harrison

Paul was born in Newcastle-upon-Tyne and grew up in County Durham. This left him with an accent that people find trustworthy, surveys have confirmed. It also left him with an allegiance to Newcastle United football club. Newcastle won their last major trophy months before he was born. In bleak moments, he wonders if this is his fault.
After a degree in Southampton he worked in a variety of different jobs with mixed success. He's been a labourer for a roofer (rubbish), a labourer for a builder (he was keen, but rubbish), a waiter (really rubbish) and a barman (merely adequate). He's sold double glazing (rubbish), toys (not bad), and garden furniture (all right at that). Somehow he never got sacked-it must have been that trustworthy accent. Since then he's been a children's books editor (not bad at that, actually) and now he writes them for what may loosely be described as a living.

Paul lives with his wife and two children in West Sussex.

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