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The Second World War

Antony Beevor

4 Reviews

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Prose: non-fiction, Second World War

A magisterial, single-volume history of the greatest conflict the world has ever known by our foremost military historian.

The Second World War began in August 1939 on the edge of Manchuria and ended there exactly six years later with the Soviet invasion of northern China. The war in Europe appeared completely divorced from the war in the Pacific and China, and yet events on opposite sides of the world had profound effects. Using the most up-to-date scholarship and research, Beevor assembles the whole picture in a gripping narrative that extends from the North Atlantic to the South Pacific and from the snowbound steppe to the North African Desert.

Although filling the broadest canvas on a heroic scale, Beevor's The Second World War never loses sight of the fate of the ordinary soldiers and civilians whose lives were crushed by the titanic forces unleashed in this, the most terrible war in history.

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Praise for The Second World War

  • Beevor can be credited with single-handedly transforming the reputation of military history - GUARDIAN

  • His singular ability to make huge historical events accessible to a general audience recalls the golden age of British narrative history - INDEPENDENT

  • His accounts of the key moments in the Second World War have a sense of colour, drama and immediacy that few narrative historians can match - SUNDAY TIMES

  • This is as comprehensive and objective an account of the course of the war as we are likely to get, and the most humanly moving to date - NEW STATESMAN

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Antony Beevor

A regular in the 11th Hussars, Antony Beevor served in Germany and England. He has had a number of books published and his book Stalingrad was awarded the Samuel Johnson Prize, the Wolfson History Prize and the Hawthornden Prize. Among the many prestigious posts he holds, he is a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.

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