Your cart

Close

Total AUD

Checkout

Imprint

  • Hodder & Stoughton
  • Hodder Paperbacks

The Balcony

Jane Delury

5 Reviews

Rated 0

Modern & contemporary fiction (post c 1945)

What if our homes could tell the stories of others who lived there before us?

'Sweeping, suspenseful, rich with surprises and eerie atmosphere' Jennifer Egan

'Riveting . . . [the] stories, related in spare but evocative prose, offer fresh looks at human appetites - sex, love, money, art, culture - while exploring the ups and downs of childhood, family, friendship and aging . . . a compelling saga' Daily Mail

To those who have ventured past it over the years, this small estate in a village outside Paris has always seemed calm and poised.

But should you open the gates and enter inside, you will find rooms which have become the silent witnesses to a century of human drama: from the young American au pair who developed a crush on her brilliant employer to the ex-courtesan who shocked the servants, and the Jewish couple who hid from the Gestapo to the housewife who began an affair while renovating the rooms downstairs.

The house has kept its inhabitants secrets for a hundred years. Now, they are ready to be brought to the light. . .

Read More Read Less

Praise for The Balcony

  • Jane Delury arrives on the scene of her debut with a sensibility fully formed and a breathtaking array of writerly gifts at her command.

  • Riveting . . . [the] stories, related in spare but evocative prose, offer fresh looks at human appetites - sex, love, money, art, culture - while exploring the ups and downs of childhood, family, friendship and aging . . . a compelling saga - Daily Mail

  • A delicate fretwork of lives, relationships and secrets . . . Strikingly deft and nuanced; a writer to watch. - Kirkus starred review

  • The prose is sharp, and the stories are instantly engaging. - People Magazine

  • The tensions between country-idyll expectations and dispiriting realities course throughout this shimmering debut novel, whose time-hopping narrative depicts the interconnected journeys of the estate's sundry inhabitants from its 19th-century origins to the recent past. - The New York Times

Read More Read Less