Your cart

Close

Total AUD

Checkout

Imprint

  • The Murder Room

The Girl Hunters

Mickey Spillane

Write Review

Rated 0

Mike Hammer, Fiction, Crime & mystery

'[Spillane] was a quintessential Cold War writer, an unconditional believer in good and evil' Washington Times

Seven years of hitting the hard stuff have taken it out of PI Mike Hammer. That's how long it's been since he gave his beloved secretary the job from which she never returned.

Now he's back with a vengeance. Velda is alive, if only he can reach her in time. But New York's toughest investigator still has friends in the right places. And his long-neglected .45 is definitely one of those.

Piecing together the puzzling deaths of a senator, a newsagent and an FBI man, Hammer finds the missing link in a murderous network of international spies. One that turns out to be Spillane's kind of beauty - and who knows a good deal more than she should.

Read More Read Less

Mickey Spillane

Born Frank Morrison Spillane in Brooklyn, New York City, Mickey Spillane started writing while at high school. During the Second World War, he enlisted in the Army Air Corps and became a fighter pilot and instructor. After the war, he moved to South Carolina. He was married three times, the third time to Jane Rogers Johnson, and had four children and two stepchildren. He wrote his first novel, I, the Jury (1947), in order to raise the money to buy a house for himself and his first wife, Mary Ann Pearce. The novel sold six and a half million copies in the United States, and introduced Spillane's most famous character, the hardboiled PI Mike Hammer. The many novels that followed became instant bestsellers, until in 1980 the US all-time fiction bestseller list of fifteen titles boasted seven by Mickey Spillane. More than 225 million copies of his books have sold internationally. He was uniformly disliked by critics, owing to the high content of sex and violence in his books. However, he was later praised by American mystery writers Max Alan Collins and William L. DeAndrea, as well as artist Markus Lupertz. The novelist Ayn Rand, a friend of Spillane's, appreciated the black-and-white morality of his books. Spillane was an active Jehovah's Witness. He died in 2006.

This website uses cookies. Using this website means you are okay with this but you can find out more and learn how to manage your cookie choices here.Close cookie policy overlay