Your cart

Close

Total AUD

Checkout

Imprint

  • Abacus

Germany: Jekyll And Hyde: A Contemporary Account of Nazi Germany

Sebastian Haffner

4 Reviews

Rated 0

Prose: non-fiction, History

Brilliantly insightful analysis of Hitler's Germany first published in 1940, written by the author of DEFYING HITLER

A few years ago, Sebastian Haffner's DEFYING HITLER, a memoir about growing up in interwar Germany, sold over forty thousand copies. After he moved to Britain in the 1930s Haffner became so shocked about the situation in his native country that he wrote this book, GERMANY: JEKYLL AND HYDE, in an effort to help people understand the danger Hitler presented to the world.

An incredibly accessible book, it is packed with acute analysis of both Hitler and the German people - from the Nazi leaders all the way down to those who opposed them - and is a must-read for anyone interested in the literature of the Second World War.

Read More Read Less

Praise for Germany: Jekyll And Hyde: A Contemporary Account of Nazi Germany

  • Sebastian Haffner's book is unmatched as a contemporary analysis of the Third Reich. It is quite remarkable that, writing in 1940, he could produce such acute insights into Hitler's character and political hold over Germany - IAN KERSHAW

  • An alarm call trying to awaken the British to the unique nature of Hitler and the Nazi regime ... Remarkably prescient - J. G. BALLARD

  • Haffner's clear-sighted analysis annihilates any claim by his contemporaries not to have known about Nazi crimes. Apocryphally, Churchill told his cabinet to read this book so that they would understand the Nazi threat. We should do likewise to understand how close we came to ignoring it - OBSERVER

  • A powerful and sustained text . . . it explodes with rhetorical fireworks. Haffner produces a convincing picture of the Nazis, their numbers, their power and the destructive nihilism that united them - Giles MacDonogh, BBC HISTORY

Read More Read Less

Sebastian Haffner

Sebastian Haffner was born in 1907 in Berlin. He emigrated to England in 1938 and wrote for the OBSERVER for many years. He returned to Germany in 1954, where he became a prominent journalist and historian, writing for DIE WELT and STERN. He died in 1999.

This website uses cookies. Using this website means you are okay with this but you can find out more and learn how to manage your cookie choices here.Close cookie policy overlay