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The Battle of Normandy 1944

Robin Neillands

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Prose: non-fiction, European history, Military history, Second World War

A fresh and incisive examination of one of the Second World War s crucial campaigns, the battle for Normandy in the months after D-Day

What happened to the Allied armies in Normandy in the months after D-Day, 1944? Why, after the initial success of the landings, did their advance stall a few miles inland from the beaches? Why did the British take so long to capture Caen? Why did the US infantry struggle so much in the bocage south of Omaha beach? Who was right about the conduct of the land campaign - Eisenhower or Montgomery? How did the Germans, deprived of air support, manage to hold off such a massive Allied force for more than two months? And if Enigma was allowing the Allies to read German battle plans, why did things go wrong as often as they did? The Battle of Normandy re-examines the demands and difficulties of the campaign and sheds new light on both with the aid of accounts from veterans on both sides. (Oral history forms a large part of the book.) It also analyses in detail the plans and performance of the commanders involved: Eisenhower, Bradley, Patton, Montgomery, Crerar and, of course, Rommel. Controversial and at times catastrophic, the Battle of Normandy was the last great set-piece battle in history and is long overdue for reassessment.

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Robin Neillands

Robin Neillands served in 45 Commando Royal Marines during the 1950s. He now works as a journalist and travel writer and has a growing reputation as a military historian. He has published many books on British military history from the Napoleonic era through to the Second World War.

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