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  • Gollancz
  • Gollancz

Sea of Rust

C. Robert Cargill

4 Reviews

Rated 0

Fiction, Fantasy

A scavenger robot wanders in the wasteland created by a war that has destroyed humanity in this evocative post-apocalyptic robot western from the critically acclaimed author, screenwriter, and noted film critic. Humankind is extinct. Wiped out in a global uprising by the very machines made to serve them. Now the world is controlled by One World Intelligences - vast mainframes that have assimilated the minds of millions of robots.

But not all robots are willing to cede their individuality, and Brittle - a loner and scavenger, focused solely on survival - is one of the holdouts.

Only, individuality comes at a price, and after a near-deadly encounter with another AI, Brittle is forced to seek sanctuary. Not easy when an OWI has decided to lay siege to the nearest safe city.

Critically damaged, Brittle has to hold it together long enough to find the essential rare parts to make repairs - but as a robot's CPU gradually deteriorates, all their old memories resurface. For Brittle, that means one haunting memory in particular . . .

SEA OF RUST boldly imagines a future in which no hope should remain, and yet a humanlike AI strives to find purpose among the ruins.

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Praise for Sea of Rust

  • The author has created a world where genies argue philosophy and complain about booze, and angels use rooftops as a place to perch. Though none of this is terribly original or subtle, it is very well put together and the narrative is multi-layered and clever, but not so cunning as to be a difficult read. If you liked American Gods and Some Kind of Fairy Tale, then this will be right up your alley. Undoubtedly one to watch, C. Robert Cargill has penned a thoroughly enchanting debut novel (DREAMS AND SHADOWS review) - STARBURST

  • As a noted film critic, there is evidence that C. Robert Cargill draws inspiration from urban legends tackled by the big screen. After reading the first chapter, you will be left wondering how on earth the remaining 359 pages are ever going to live up to the the ones just turned. C Robert Cargill's debut crams so much into its first chapter, can there be any more story to tell? Emphatically, the answer is yes (DREAMS AND SHADOWS review) - SciFiNow

  • Dreams and Shadows has elements of Gaiman, Rothfuss and the Brothers Grimm themselves. But make no mistakes, this is Cargill's novel - a majestic tale of love in the shadows and death in bloody dreams. It's a

  • For a first novel, it's phenomenal. Deliciously moreish, expect Dreams and Shadows to become modern horror fantasy legend and Cargill's lore to soar (DREAMS AND SHADOWS review) - SFX

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