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  • Little, Brown

Scarfe: Sixty Years of Being Rude

Gerald Scarfe

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Autobiography: arts & entertainment

A beautifully illustrated book that presents work spanning Gerald Scarfe's incredible artistic career.

In the stunning retrospective Scarfe, which expands on 2005's Drawing Blood in every way, Gerald Scarfe's work is presented as no book has presented it before. This fully illustrated, 576-page volume reveals the truth of sixty years of politics and culture, packed with images that have defined not only one artist's career, but also twentieth and twenty-first century British life. A showcase of Scarfe's glittering career in design, reportage and showbusiness, Scarfe presents drawings, sculptures and photographs alongside witty and poignant captions and stories. Scarfe's muses: Thatcher, Clinton, Blair, May and Trump, as well as many other titanic figures of our times are all here, revealed as they really are by Scarfe's cutting pen. Carefully curated by the artist himself, this monumental book is the definitive guide to the career of a national treasure.

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Gerald Scarfe

Gerald Scarfe began his career in the sixties working for Punch and Private Eye before taking a job as a political cartoonist for the Daily Mail. He then worked for Time magazine in New York before starting his long association with the Sunday Times. He now draws weekly for the Evening Standard. His varied career has seen him work with Pink Floyd (The Wall, Wish You Were Here), Roger Waters and Eric Clapton (The Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking), Disney (Hercules), English National Ballet (The Nutcracker), Los Angeles Opera (Fantastic Mr Fox) as well as produce such iconic images as those for the titles of Yes, Minister and Yes, Prime Minister. His work has featured in the New Yorker and various BBC TV films such as Scarfe on Sex and Scarfe on Class. Exhibitions of his paintings and drawings have appeared in the Tate Gallery, the National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery. He is viewed by many as both a national treasure and a genius.

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