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What Does Israel Fear from Palestine?

Raja Shehadeh

4 Reviews

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Israel, Palestine, Middle Eastern history

A searing reflection on the failures of Israel to treat Palestine and Palestinians as equals, as partners on the road to peace instead of genocide.

When the state of Israel was formed in 1948, it precipitated the Nakba or 'disaster': the displacement of the Palestine nation, creating fracture-lines which continue to erupt in violent and tragic ways today.

In the years that followed, while the Berlin Wall crumbled and South Africa abolished apartheid, the Israeli government rejected every opportunity for reconciliation with Palestine. But Raja Shehadeh, human rights lawyer and Palestine's greatest living writer, suggests that this does not mean the two nations cannot work together as
partners on the road to peace, not genocide.

In graceful, devastatingly observed prose, this is a fresh perspective for a time of great need.

Medical Aid for Palestinians (MAP) is a registered charity in the UK with charity no. 1045315.

A portion of the proceeds* received by Profile Books from this audiobook will be given to the charity for their work for the health and dignity of Palestinians living under occupation and as refugees. This donation has been made possible by the author Raja Shehadeh, Refaat Alareer, Khalid Abdalla and Profile Books.

*Proceeds means the cash-price or cash-equivalent price less sales taxes.

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Praise for What Does Israel Fear from Palestine?

  • In his moral clarity and baring of the heart, his self-questioning and insistence on focusing on the experience of the individual within the storms of nationalist myth and hubris, Shehadeh recalls writers such as Ghassan Kanafani and Primo Levi - New York Times

  • A buoy in a sea of bleakness - Rachel Kushner

  • Shehadeh is a great inquiring spirit with a tone that is vivid, ironic, melancholy and wise - Colm Toibin

  • Palestine's greatest prose writer - Observer

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