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  • Sceptre

The Slowworm's Song

Andrew Miller

9 Reviews

Rated 0

Modern & contemporary fiction (post c 1945)

By the Costa Award-winning author of PURE, a profound and tender tale of guilt, trust and a father's yearning to atone, which gives voice to those little heard in the literature of the Troubles.

By the Costa Award-winning author of PURE, a profound and tender tale of guilt, a search for atonement and the hard, uncertain work of loving.

An ex-soldier and recovering alcoholic living quietly in Somerset, Stephen Rose has just begun to form a bond with the daughter he barely knows when he receives a summons - to an inquiry into an incident during the Troubles in Northern Ireland.

It is the return of what Stephen hoped he had outdistanced. Above all, to testify would jeopardise the fragile relationship with his daughter. And if he loses her, he loses everything.

Instead, he decides to write her an account of his life; a confession, a defence, a love letter. Also a means of buying time. But time is running out, and the day comes when he must face again what happened in that faraway summer of 1982.

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Praise for The Slowworm's Song

  • Excellent - Observer

  • The plot grips and surprises. Miller's prose remains poetic and taut with an eye for the telling detail . . . this is fiction - storytelling - at its best - Spectator

  • Written in prose that comes singing off the page . . . a compelling read and an important literary achievement - New Statesman

  • 'Beautifully written'

  • PRAISE FOR NOW WE SHALL BE ENTIRELY FREE:

  • Pitch-perfect

  • The pacing of his story is excellent; his style is crisp; his apprehension of pain is arresting; and his ability to show people trembling at the edge of unreason is compelling - Guardian

  • Enthralling - Financial Times

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Andrew Miller

Andrew Miller's first novel, Ingenious Pain, was published by Sceptre in 1997. It won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award and the Grinzane Cavour Prize for the best foreign novel published in Italy. It has been followed by Casanova, Oxygen, which was shortlisted for the Booker Prize and the Whitbread Novel of the Year Award in 2001, The Optimists, One Morning Like A Bird, Pure, which won the Costa Book of the Year Award 2011, The Crossing and Now We Shall Be Entirely Free.

Andrew Miller's novels have been published in translation in twenty countries. Born in Bristol in 1960, he currently lives in Somerset.

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