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As a man who has shown us the far reaches of the earth and introduced us to creatures and natural beauty we didn't even know existed - we have to assume that you have at least one awe-inspiring moment that you have shared with the great broadcaster and naturalist, David Attenborough. We certainly do! Here's a few of our favourite David Attenborough moments . . .



There are always jaw-dropping scenes in David Attenborough’s nature programs but the Killer Whales (in Frozen Planet) working as a pack to hunt a seal off the ice is the one that sticks in my mind. I remember the hunting scene being described as wave washing, and whilst it was a nerve-wracking scene (it’s never easy watching animals hunt), it was also an incredible, mesmerizing piece of footage. 7 years later people still refer to that scenes as an eye-opener to how whales hunt and how sophisticated it is. Go see it for yourself.

Ella C - Head of Consumer Marketing



I remember watching Life in the Undergrowth with my small son and getting to the part where the leopard slugs mate and being completely transfixed/repulsed while worrying my son was going to ask questions I didn’t want to answer. 

Chris K - Head of Children's Publishing


This quote is probably too much but I love it 

When Creationists talk about God creating every individual species as a separate act, they always instance hummingbirds, or orchids, sunflowers and beautiful things.

But I tend to think instead of a parasitic worm that is boring through the eye of a boy sitting on the bank of a river in West Africa, [a worm] that’ going to make him blind.

And [I ask them], 'Are you telling me that the God you believe in, who you also say is an all-merciful God, who cares for each one of us individually, are you saying that God created this worm that can live in no other way than in an innocent child’s eyeball? Because that doesn’t seem to me to coincide with a God who’ full of mercy.'

Dan P - Sales Director



This footage of great white sharks is completely fascinating and extraordinary.  They are such majestic and wonderous creatures, but I hope to never be mistaken for a seal!

Louise SS - CEO



Attenborough completely ripping into a sloth and slinging insults such as ‘moving compost heap’ and creeps on Mr. Sloth to just yell ‘BOO’ in his face. The sloth’s reaction makes this moment.

Sarah H - Marketing Executive



Just hilarious.

Kelly J - Campaign Manager



The odds are stacked against these baby iguanas who, to begin their life, have to escape to the ocean by crossing a sandy, snake-infested area. The tension in this heart-pounding race for survival is up there with the best thrillers i've seen. My knuckles were white!

Louise M - Campaign Manager

  • Journeys to the Other Side of the World - David Attenborough

    Following the success of the original Zoo Quest expeditions, in the late 1950s onwards the young David Attenborough embarked on further travels in a very different part of the world. From Madagascar and New Guinea to the Pacific Islands and the Northern Territory of Australia, he and his cameraman companion were aiming to record not just the wildlife, but the way of life of some of the indigenous people of these regions, whose traditions had never been encountered by most of the British public before. From the land divers of Pentecost Island and the sing-sings of New Guinea, to a Royal Kava ceremony on Tonga and the ancient art of the Northern Territory, it is a journey like no other. Alongside these remarkable cultures he encounters paradise birds, chameleons, sifakas and many more animals in some of the most unique environments on the planet.

  • Adventures of a Young Naturalist - David Attenborough

    In 1954, a young television presenter was offered the opportunity of a lifetime - to travel the world finding rare and elusive animals for London Zoo's collection, and to film the expeditions for the BBC. This is the story of those voyages. Staying with local tribes while trekking in search of giant anteaters in Guyana, Komodo dragons in Indonesia and armadillos in Paraguay, he and the rest of the team battled with cannibal fish, aggressive tree porcupines and escape-artist wild pigs, as well as treacherous terrain and unpredictable weather, to record the incredible beauty and biodiversity of these regions. The methods may be outdated now, but the fascination and respect for the wildlife, the people and the environment - and the importance of protecting these wild places - is not. Written with his trademark wit and charm, ADVENTURES OF A YOUNG NATURALIST is not just the story of a remarkable adventure, but of the man who made us fall in love with the natural world, and who is still doing so today.

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