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The Strange Laws Of Old England

Nigel Cawthorne

1 Reviews

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Prose: non-fiction, History, Humour collections & anthologies

An entertaining tour of the wilder shores of the British legal system.

Did you know that: It's against the law to check into a hotel in London under assumed names for the purpose of lovemaking? Under a statute of Edwards II all whales washed up on the shore belong to the monarch? Under a Tudor law Welshmen are not allowed into the city of Chester after dark?

In THE STRANGE LAWS OF OLD ENGLAND, Nigel Cawthorne unearths an extraordinary collection of the most bizarre and arcane laws that have been enacted over the centuries. Some of the laws, incredibly, are still in force. It is still illegal to enter the Houses of Parliament in a suit of armour. . . This elegant and amusing book is perfect for everyone fascinated by the eccentric history of these islands.

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Praise for The Strange Laws Of Old England

  • Because of doubts about their moral character, there is an ordinance in Great Yarmouth in Norfolk banning the naming of streets after Shakespeare, Chaucer Byron or any other great poet ; at St Peter's . . . a law forbids ladies showing their ankles in public on pain of being put in the stocks . . . This light-hearted trawl through statute books, both past and present , unearths dozens of similar laws, some of which, bizarrely, are still in force . . . Who said the law was dull? - This England

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Nigel Cawthorne

Nigel Cawthorne is the author of a number of successful true crime and popular history books. His writing has appeared in over 150 newspapers, magazines and partworks - from the Sun to the Financial Times, and from Flatbush Life to The New York Tribune. He lives in London.