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  • John Murray
  • John Murray

George Mackay Brown

Maggie Fergusson

8 Reviews

Rated 0

Biography: general, Biography: literary, Prose: non-fiction, Literature: history & criticism, British & Irish history

One of the most highly acclaimed biographies of 2006 -- now published in paperback

George Mackay Brown was one of Scotland's greatest twentieth-century writers, but in person a bundle of paradoxes. He had a wide international reputation, but hardly left his native Orkney. A prolific poet, admired by such fellow poets as Seamus Heaney, Ted Hughes and Charles Causley, and hailed by the composer Peter Maxwell Davies as 'the most positive and benign influence ever on my own efforts at creation', he was also an accomplished novelist (shortlisted for the 1994 Booker Prize for Beside the Ocean of Time) and a master of the short story. When he died in 1996, he left behind an autobiography as deft as it is ultimately uninformative.

'The lives of artists are as boring and also as uniquely fascinating as any or every other life,' he claimed. Never a recluse, he appeared open to his friends, but probably revealed more of himself in his voluminous correspondence with strangers. He never married - indeed he once wrote, 'I have never been in love in my life.' But some of his most poignant letters and poems were written to Stella Cartwright, 'the Muse of Rose Street', the gifted but tragic figure to whom he was once engaged and with whom he kept in touch until the end of her short life.

Maggie Fergusson interviewed George Mackay Brown several times and is the only biographer to whom he, a reluctant subject, gave his blessing. Through his letters and through conversations with his wide acquaintance, she discovers that this particular artist's life was not only fascinating but vivid, courageous and surprising.

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Praise for George Mackay Brown

  • Other biographies to relish include Maggie Fergusson's life of the poet George Mackay Brown... - Boyd Tonkin, Independent

  • In Maggie Fergusson, Mackay Brown has had the good fortune to find the kind of biographer with whom every writer should be blessed. She writes lucidly, with restraint and without sentimentality. Her affection and sympathy for her subject shine through but she never shirks from showing his darker side. He was a deeply troubled man cursed with melancholia whose legacy was prose and poetry of luminous virtuosity. If there is a better biography of a 20th century Scottish writer I look forward to reading it - Sunday Herald

  • Outstanding... This is an extraordinarily good book; it is sensitive, witty and has an excellent sense of the vitality of the apparently unimportant details that make up lives and characters. - Lucy Lethbridge, New Statesman

  • An affectionate but clear-sighted biography. Read it alongside his Collected Poems and step into the 'small green world' of [the Orkneys] - The Times

  • Unmissable - Glasgow Herald

  • [Fergusson's] biography is infused with love and understanding of the man and his work... she writes with a delicate precision - Sunday Times, Jeremy Lewis

  • Through his letter and conversations with many friends, Maggie Ferguson discovers that George's life was vivid, courageous and surprising - Scottish Field

  • He deserves a good biography but has got a magnificent one; sympathetic, affectionate, but not glossing over his weaknesses - Allan Massie, Daily Telegraph

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Maggie Fergusson

Maggie Fergusson has written for newspapers and magazines including The Times, the Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph, Harpers & Queen and the Independent magazine, and is Secretary of the Royal Society of Literature. She is married with two daughters and lives in London. This is her first book.

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