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Little Tales of Misogyny: A Virago Modern Classic

Patricia Highsmith

8 Reviews

Rated 0

Virago Modern Classics, Fiction, Modern & contemporary fiction (post c 1945), Classic fiction (pre c 1945)

Seventeen menacing spine-chillers full of Patricia Highsmith's trademark simmering malice.

LITTLE TALES OF MISOGYNY is Highsmith's legendary, cultish short-story collection. With an eerie simplicity of style, Highsmith turns our next-door neighbours into sadistic psychopaths, lying in wait among white picket fences and manicured lawns. In these darkly satirical, often hilarious, sketches you'll meet seemingly familiar women with the power to destroy both themselves and the men around them.

'The No.1 Greatest Crime Writer' The Times

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Praise for Little Tales of Misogyny: A Virago Modern Classic

  • These little tales are tremendous fun, glorious hand grenades lobbed at the reader by a gleeful, cackling Patricia Highsmith - Dan Rhodes

  • These little tales are tremendous fun, glorious hand grenades lobbed at the reader by a gleeful, cackling Patricia Highsmith - Dan Rhodes

  • For eliciting the menace that lurks in familiar surroundings, there's no one like Patricia Highsmith - Time

  • For eliciting the menace that lurks in familiar surroundings, there's no one like Patricia Highsmith - Time

  • One of our greatest modernist writers - Gore Vidal

  • One of our greatest modernist writers - Gore Vidal

  • [Highsmith's] characters are irrational, and they leap to life in their very lack of reason; suddenly we realize how unbelievably rational most fictional characters are . . . Highsmith is the poet of apprehension rather than fear - Graham Greene

  • [Highsmith's] characters are irrational, and they leap to life in their very lack of reason; suddenly we realize how unbelievably rational most fictional characters are . . . Highsmith is the poet of apprehension rather than fear - Graham Greene

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Patricia Highsmith

Patricia Highsmith (1921-1995) was born in Fort Worth, Texas, and moved to New York when she was six, where she attended the Julia Richman High School and Barnard College. In her senior year she edited the college magazine, having decided at the age of sixteen to become a writer. Her first novel, Strangers on a Train, was made into a classic film by Alfred Hitchcock in 1951. The Talented Mr Ripley, published in 1955, introduced the fascinating anti-hero Tom Ripley, and was made into an Oscar-winning film in 1999 by Anthony Minghella. Graham Greene called Patricia Highsmith 'the poet of apprehension', saying that she 'created a world of her own - a world claustrophobic and irrational which we enter each time with a sense of personal danger' and The Times named her no.1 in their list of the greatest ever crime writers. Patricia Highsmith died in Locarno, Switzerland, in February 1995. Her last novel, Small g: A Summer Idyll, was published posthumously, the same year.

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