Your cart

Close

Total AUD

Checkout

Imprint

  • Constable
  • Constable

The Three Degrees: The Men Who Changed British Football Forever

Paul Rees

Write Review

Rated 0

Biography: sport, Prose: non-fiction, Football (Soccer, Association football)

The Dark Side of British Football in the 1970s

When Cyrille Regis became one of the first black players to be selected for the full England team, he was sent a package in the mail. Inside it was a silver bullet and a note that read: You ll get one of these through your knees if you step on our Wembley turf.

In the 1978/79 football season Regis' club West Bromwich Albion, an unglamorous and little publicised club from the West Midlands, became the first British football team to field three black players: Cyrille Regis, Laurie Cunningham and Brendon Batson. They did so against the backdrop of the most divisive and poisonous racial tension in the UK s history a time when the National Front movement was at its most virulent.

This book will tell the story of a defining and groundbreaking chapter in the history of British football and the country as a whole. The story is one about sport but also as much one about social change.

Read More Read Less

Paul Rees

Paul Rees is a former award-winning Editor of the fabled British rock weekly Kerrang! and was Editor-in-Chief of Q magazine for ten years. His work has also appeared in such publications as the Sunday Times Culture, the Observer, the Sunday Times Magazine, the Telegraph, the Sunday Express and Classic Rock.

He is the author of six previous books, among these the best-selling Robert Plant: a Life, The Three Degrees: the Men Who Changed British Football Forever, which was long-listed for the William Hill Sports Book of the Year, and The Gospel According to Luke.

Readers also viewed

This website uses cookies. Using this website means you are okay with this but you can find out more and learn how to manage your cookie choices here.Close cookie policy overlay